Tag Archives: social practice

Doctor-Directed Speech, and Me

My first memory of a sociophonetic experience that led to an actual research project was when I was about seventeen years old. I was seeing a new doctor in my hometown (Flagstaff, Arizona), and I was surprised to hear myself … Continue reading

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The Likely Future Demise of ‘Gotcha Day’

I’m a linguist, but I work with sounds, not words. And I mostly work on describing patterns of pronunciation that already exist, rather than making too many predictions about the future. When I do make predictions, they’re on the order … Continue reading

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How Accents Work

I wrote the following article by request from the Ragged University, who will be hosting my upcoming talk at the Counting House on the evening of 11 September. The basic idea behind the Ragged Project¬†is what some call ‘knowledge exchange’ … Continue reading

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Why Even Good Drivers Need Driving Lessons (in the UK)

Yesterday, I got my UK driving licence — on my first try (after 20 hours of lessons), and with only three minor faults, despite being a bundle of nerves and taking what felt like an hour just to parallel park. … Continue reading

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Outdated? Or just American…

There’s something funny that happens when you are a student in one place and then a working person in another: the memories of time in school get mixed up with the memories of the place itself. Although this is clearly … Continue reading

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Why do I do what I do?

Choosing a career in academia, and specifically a career of linguistic research, doesn’t have an immediately obvious benefit for the world in the way that many other jobs do. We’re not discovering medical cures, feeding starving children, or fixing your … Continue reading

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parallel parking, willy nilly

If there’s one thing that continues to puzzle me about Britain, it’s this: There seem to be no rules governing the direction a car faces when it’s parallel parked.¬† I’ve been noticing this ever since I got here; I see … Continue reading

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